Watchmakers Tools

First, I have no idea why they call it a frog. I can only hope the Swiss of olde didn’t use actual frogs to polish metal since I can’t see that ending well for the frog. Either way I found this one with the parts fixture included. You often see these with holes or notches filed into them for polishing screws. Old watchmakers would have something to say about that I’m sure and no such abomination will be performed on this one.

So far it’s only been used for a setting spring for a Gruen/Aegler which was a clients watch, so no photo’s.

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

After cleaning and removing olde frog sweat. Since details of making these are sparse I’ll add photos with measurements of the individual pieces. This should help anyone who wishes to make one for themselves.

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Finally got around to replacing my older poising tool with an even older poising tool. Made in Glashutte for the German watchmaking industry is this Ernst Kreissig and I’ve never seen one finished quite the same way. It came with a fair amount of rust but after an ultrasonic bath and some turning off the pitted main screw it looks a lot more presentable. It’s a larger model than some of the newer ones I’ve see and the protected jaws are in new condition.

 

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

 

 

 

 

It’s not often you see surface decoration on a poising tool.

The Marshall Tri-Duty Staking Set

The Marshall Tri-Duty Staking Set

I’ve never done so much research on a watchmaking tool only to have pure luck step in at the last moment. I originally thought of a dual purpose staking and jewelling set but after receiving good advice on the NAWCC and Gruen Forums decided on separate tools for quality reasons.

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