After looking for close to a year and not finding anything suitable I decided to take the chance and acquire one of the Vector copies from a China based E-Bay seller. These milling attachments have been both criticized and praised on horological forums with only a few people actually buying them and adapting them for their use. Luckily the opinion of the people who were using them was quite a bit more positive than the people who hadn’t actually seen one. I know, it’s the internet.

It did require some minor dressing around the front of the spindle where an unbroken edge was contacting the sleeve. I also gave the spindle a very light polish on both contact surfaces which was done in the universal chuck.

A set of cutters is on the way but in the meantime I’m concentrating on how to provide the power. Either a small motor attached via a bracket from the rear gusset or through a counter shaft.

Milling Attachment

Milling Attachment

If you can’t tell immediately , I did a fair bit of dressing on the casting as it was a fairly crude shell as it came. The grinding itself was good enough but the finish was crudely painted which hid a few warts on the cast.

Milling attachment

Milling attachment

I punched a zero mark where the lightly etched line was prior to re-finishing.

Milling attachment

Milling attachment

If the dedicated motor option is used it will be mounted on this side of the gusset. an L-bracket can be shaped to provide the proper tension for vertical or horizontal position.

First, I have no idea why they call it a frog. I can only hope the Swiss of olde didn’t use actual frogs to polish metal since I can’t see that ending well for the frog. Either way I found this one with the parts fixture included. You often see these with holes or notches filed into them for polishing screws. Old watchmakers would have something to say about that I’m sure and no such abomination will be performed on this one.

So far it’s only been used for a setting spring for a Gruen/Aegler which was a clients watch, so no photo’s.

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

Black Polishing Frog

After cleaning and removing olde frog sweat. Since details of making these are sparse I’ll add photos with measurements of the individual pieces. This should help anyone who wishes to make one for themselves.

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Finally got around to replacing my older poising tool with an even older poising tool. Made in Glashutte for the German watchmaking industry is this Ernst Kreissig and I’ve never seen one finished quite the same way. It came with a fair amount of rust but after an ultrasonic bath and some turning off the pitted main screw it looks a lot more presentable. It’s a larger model than some of the newer ones I’ve see and the protected jaws are in new condition.

 

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

Ernst Kreissig Poising tool

 

 

 

 

It’s not often you see surface decoration on a poising tool.